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Edmund Burke Quotes

Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could only do a little.
Edmund Burke
Ambition can creep as well as soar.
Edmund Burke (Letters on a Regicide Peace, 1796)
It is not what a lawyer tells me I may do; but what humanity, reason, and justice tell me I ought to do.
Edmund Burke (Speech on Concillation with the American Colonies, 1775)
We must all obey the great law of change. It is the most powerful law of nature.
Edmund Burke (Letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe, 1792)
If we command our wealth, we shall be rich and free; if our wealth commands us, we are poor indeed.
Edmund Burke (Letters on a Regicide Peace, 1796)
Bad laws are the worst sort of tyranny.
Edmund Burke (Speech to the Electors of Bristol, 1774)
People will not look forward to posterity, who never look backward to their ancestors.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
To make us love our country, our country ought to be lovely. 
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
Toleration is good for all, or it is good for none.
Edmund Burke (Speech on the Bill for the Relief of Protestant Dissenters, 1773)
In a democracy, the majority of the citizens is capable of exercising the most cruel oppressions upon the minority.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
When any work seems to have required immense force and labor to effect it, the idea is grand.
Edmund Burke (A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, 1757)
To drive men from independence to live on alms, is itself great cruelty.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
Superstition is the religion of feeble minds.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
The greater the power, the more dangerous the abuse.
Edmund Burke (Speech on the Middlesex Elections, 1771)
Make the Revolution a parent of settlement, and not a nursery of future revolutions.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
One that confounds good and evil is an enemy to good. 
Edmund Burke (Speech on the Impeachment of Warren Hastings, 1788)
It is the nature of all greatness not to be exact. 
Edmund Burke (First Speech on Conciliation with America, 1775)
Gentlemen, the melancholy event of yesterday reads to us an awful lesson against being too much troubled about any of the objects of ordinary ambition. The worthy gentleman, who has been snatched from us at the moment of the election, and in the middle of contest, whilst his desires were as warm, and his hopes as eager as ours, has feelingly told us, what shadows we are, and what shadows we pursue.
Edmund Burke (Speech at Bristol, 1780)
I venture to say no war can be long carried on against the will of the people.
Edmund Burke (Letters on a Regicide Peace, 1796)
Example is the school of mankind, and they will learn at no other. 
Edmund Burke (Letters on a Regicide Peace, 1796)
Whenever a separation is made between liberty and justice, neither, in my opinion, is safe.
Edmund Burke (Letter to Monsieur Dupont, 1789)
By hating vices too much, they come to love men too little.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
There is a boundary to men's passions when they act from feelings; but none when they are under the influence of imagination.
Edmund Burke (Appeal From the New to the Old Whigs, 1791)
Poetry is the art of substantiating shadows, and of lending existence to nothing.
Edmund Burke (Quoted in Correspondence of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, 1826)
Depend upon it, that the lovers of freedom will be free.
Edmund Burke (Speech at Bristol Previous to the Election, 1780)
The most important of all revolutions, a revolution in sentiments, manners and moral opinions.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
People crushed by laws, have no hope but to evade power. If the laws are their enemies, they will be enemies to the law; and those who have most to hope and nothing to lose will always be dangerous.
Edmund Burke (Letter to Charles James Fox, 1777)
Rudeness is the weak man’s imitation of strength.
Edmund Burke
Custom reconciles us to everything.
Edmund Burke (A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, 1757)
Men are qualified for civil liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains on their own appetites. Society cannot exist unless a controlling power upon will and appetite be placed somewhere, and the less of it there is within, the more there is without. It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters.
Edmund Burke (Letter to a Member of the National Assembly, 1791)
It is, generally, in the season of prosperity that men discover their real temper, principles, and designs.
Edmund Burke (Letters on a Regicide Peace, 1796)
There is, however, a limit at which forbearance ceases to be a virtue.
Edmund Burke (Observations on a Late Publication on the Present State of the Nation, 1769)
He that struggles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
A great profusion of things, which are splendid or valuable in themselves, is magnificent. The starry heaven, though it occurs so very frequently to our view, never fails to excite an idea of grandeur. This cannot be owing to the stars themselves, separately considered. The number is certainly the cause.
Edmund Burke (A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, 1757)
Never despair, but if you do, work on in despair.
Edmund Burke (Quoted Correspondence of Edmund Burke and William Windham, 1910)
Falsehood is a perennial spring.
Edmund Burke (Speech on American Taxation, 1774)
There is no safety for honest men but by believing all possible evil of evil men.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
Nothing turns out to be so oppressive and unjust as a feeble government.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
Beauty in distress is much the most affecting beauty.
Edmund Burke (A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, 1757)
A disposition to preserve, and an ability to improve, taken together, would be my standard of a statesman.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
People never give up their liberties but under some delusion.
Edmund Burke (Speech at County Meeting of Buckinghamshire, 1784)
The use of force alone is but temporary. It may subdue for the moment; but it does not remove the necessity of subduing again: and a nation is not governed, which is perpetually to be conquered.
Edmund Burke (Second Speech on Concillation with America, 1775)
And having looked to Government for bread, on the very first scarcity they will turn and bite the hand that fed them.
Edmund Burke (Thoughts and Details on Scarcity, 1795)
The true danger is when liberty is nibbled away, for expedients, and by parts.
Edmund Burke (Letters to the Sherrifs of Bristol, 1777)
Laws, like houses, lean on one another.
Edmund Burke (Tracts Relative to the Laws Against Popery in Ireland, 1766)
But what is liberty without wisdom, and without virtue? It is the greatest of all possible evils; for it is folly, vice, and madness, without tuition or restraint.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
The first and simplest emotion which we discover in the human mind, is curiosity.
Edmund Burke (A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, 1757)
Woman is not made to be the admiration of all, but the happiness of one.
Edmund Burke
If the people are happy, united, wealthy, and powerful, we presume the rest. We conclude that to be good from whence good is derived. 
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
By gnawing through a dike, even a rat may drown a nation. 
Edmund Burke
If you can be well without health, you may be happy without virtue.
Edmund Burke
There is a boundary to men's passions when they act from feelings; but none when they are under the influence of imagination.
Edmund Burke (Appeal From the New to the Old Whigs, 1791)
You can never plan the future by the past.
Edmund Burke (Letter to a Member of the National Assembly, 1791)
All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.
Variant: All that's necessary for the forces of evil to win in the world is for enough good men to do nothing.
Edmund Burke
Flattery corrupts both the receiver and the giver.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
Good order is the foundation of all things.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
The march of the human mind is slow.
Edmund Burke (Second Speech on Concillation with America, 1775)
It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things, that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters.
Edmund Burke (Letter to a Member of the National Assembly, 1791)
Facts are to the mind what food is to the body. 
Edmund Burke
Tyrants seldom want pretexts.
Edmund Burke (Letter to a Member of the National Assembly, 1791)
Under the pressure of the cares and sorrows of our mortal condition, men have at all times, and in all countries, called in some physical aid to their moral consolations - wine, beer, opium, brandy, or tobacco.
Edmund Burke (Thoughts and Details on Scarcity, 1795)
No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.
Edmund Burke (A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, 1757)
To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting.
Edmund Burke
Never, no, never did Nature say one thing and Wisdom say another.
Edmund Burke (Letters on a Regicide Peace, 1796)
Our patience will achieve more than our force.
Edmund Burke (Reflections on the Revolution in France, 1790)
The Door of Direct Experience: Empowering Book by Daniel Seeker on Amazon
Edmund Burke Biography

Born: January 12, 1729
Died: July 9, 1797

Edmund Burke was an Irish statesman, writer, orator and philosopher. He is most commonly known for his support of the American Revolution and for his later opposition to the French Revolution.

Notable Works
A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757)
Reflections on the Revolution in France 1790)
Letters on a Regicide Peace (1796)
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