Herodotus Quotes

In peace, sons bury their fathers. In war, fathers bury their sons.
Variant: In peace, children inter their parents; war violates the order of nature and causes parents to inter their children.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book I, ca. 440 BCE)
The destiny of man is in his own soul.
Herodotus
This is the bitterest pain among men, to have much knowledge but no power.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book IX, ca. 440 BCE)
Haste in every business brings failures.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book VII, ca. 440 BCE)
It is better to be envied than pitied.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book III, ca. 440 BCE)
Circumstances rule men; men do not rule circumstances.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book VII, ca. 440 BCE)
Death is a delightful hiding place for weary men.
Variant: When life is so burdensome death has become a sought after refuge.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book VII, ca. 440 BCE)
Not snow, no, nor rain, nor heat, nor night keeps them from accomplishing their appointed courses with all speed.
Variant: It is said that as many days as there are in the whole journey, so many are the men and horses that stand along the road, each horse and man at the interval of a day’s journey; and these are stayed neither by snow nor rain nor heat nor darkness from accomplishing their appointed course with all speed.
Variant: Neither snow, nor rain, nor heat, nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus Book VIII, ca. 440 BCE)
Great deeds are usually wrought at great risks.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book VII, ca. 440 BCE)
It is better by noble boldness to run the risk of being subject to half the evils we anticipate than to remain in cowardly listlessness for fear of what might happen.
Herodotus
Oftentimes God gives men a gleam of happiness, and then plunges them into ruin.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book I, ca. 440 BCE)
Illness strikes men when they are exposed to change.
Herodotus
I know that human happiness never remains long in the same place.
Variant: I shall therefore discourse equally of both, convinced that human happiness never continues long in one stay.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book I, ca. 440 BCE)
If a man insisted always on being serious, and never allowed himself a bit of fun and relaxation, he would go mad or become unstable without knowing it.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book II, ca. 440 BCE)
The king's might is greater than human, and his arm is very long.
Herodotus
For assuredly he who possesses great store of riches is no nearer happiness than he who has what suffices for his daily needs, unless it so hap that luck attend upon him, and so he continue in the enjoyment of all his good things to the end of life. For many of the wealthiest men have been unfavoured of fortune, and many whose means were moderate have had excellent luck.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book I, ca. 440 BCE)
But I like not these great success of yours; for I know how jealous are the gods.
Herodotus
It is better by noble boldness to run the risk of being subject to half of the evils we anticipate than to remain in cowardly listlessness for fear of what might happen.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book VII, ca. 440 BCE)
Force has no place where there is need of skill.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book III, ca. 440 BCE)
As the old saw says well: every end does not appear together with its beginning.
Herodotus
In soft regions are born soft men.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book IX, ca. 440 BCE)
All men's gains are the fruit of venturing.
Herodotus
When a woman removes her garment, she also removes the respect that is hers.
Herodotus 
I am bound to tell what I am told, but not in every case to believe it.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book VII, ca. 440 BCE)
Some men give up their designs when they have almost reached the goal; While others, on the contrary, obtain a victory by exerting, at the last moment, more vigorous efforts than ever before.
Herodotus
Of all possessions a friend is the most precious.
Herodotus
Men trust their ears less than their eyes.
Herodotus (The Histories of Herodotus - Book I, ca. 440 BCE)

Herodotus Biography

Born: 484 B.C.E.
Died: 425 B.C.E.

Herodotus was an ancient Greek historian. He is widely known as the father of History because of narrative and his strict inquiry methods.

Notable Works

The Histories of Herodotus (440 BCE)


Related Authors
Aeschylus
Aristophanes
Democritus
Pythagoras
Socrates
Thucydides
Xenophon