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Miguel de Cervantes Quotes

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There is a remedy for all things but death, which will be sure to lay us flat some time or other.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
By a small sample we may judge of the whole piece.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote - Book I, 1605 - 1615)
Those who'll play with cats must expect to be scratched.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Truth may be stretched, but cannot be broken, and always gets above falsehood, as does oil above water. 
Variant: Truth indeed rather alleviates than hurts, and will always bear up against falsehood, as oil does above water. 
Variant: Truth will rise above falsehood as oil above water.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Diligence is the mother of good fortune.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
There's not the least thing can be said or done, but people will talk and find fault.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
A closed mouth catches no flies.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
All sorrows are bearable, if there is bread.
Miguel de Cervantes (Quoted in Spanish salt, a collection of all the proverbs which are to be found in Don Quixote, 1877)
Fair and softly goes far.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Drink moderately, for drunkeness neither keeps a secret, nor observes a promise.
Miguel de Cervantes (Quoted in The Living Thoughts of Cervantes, 1948)
Time ripens all things. No man is born wise.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Every man is as Heaven made him, and sometimes a great deal worse.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Make it thy business to know thyself, which is the most difficult lesson in the world.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Virtue is persecuted by the wicked more than it is loved by the good.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Those two fatal words, Mine and Thine.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
I do not deny that what happened to us is a thing worth laughing at. But it is not worth telling, for not everyone is sufficiently intelligent to be able to see things from the right point of view.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
I know who I am and who I may be, if I choose.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Be brief, for no discourse can please when too long.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
There are only two families in the world, my old grandmother used to say, the Haves and the Have-nots.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Forewarned, forearmed; to be prepared is half the victory.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Many count their chickens before they are hatched; and where.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Tell me thy company, and I'll tell thee what thou art.
Variant: Tell me what company thou keenest, and I'll tell thee what thou art.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Every man is the son of his own works.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Let us forget and forgive injuries.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Honesty is the best policy.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Here lies a gentleman bold 
Who was so very brave 
He went to lengths untold, 
And on the brink of the gave 
Death had on him no hold. 
By the world he set small store
He frightened it to the core
Yet somehow, by Fate's plan, 
Though he'd lived a crazy man, 
When he died he was sane once more.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Valor lies just halfway between rashness and cowardice.
Miguel de Cervantes
A proverb is a short sentence based on long experience.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Tis the only comfort of the miserable to have partners in their woes.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
For neither good nor evil can last for ever; and so it follows that as evil has lasted a long time, good must now be close at hand.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Thou hast seen nothing yet.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Ill luck, you know, seldom comes alone.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Can we ever have too much of a good thing?
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote - Book I, 1605 - 1615)
You are a king by your own fireside, as much as any monarch in his throne.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote - Prologue, 1605 - 1615)
Finally, from so little sleeping and so much reading, his brain dried up and he went completely out of his mind.
Variant: From reading too much, and sleeping too little, his brain dried up on him and he lost his judgment.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
I have always heard, Sancho, that doing good to base fellows is like throwing water into the sea.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
He who sings frightens away his ills.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Liberty, as well as honor, man ought to preserve at the hazard of his life, for without it life is insupportable.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Too much sanity may be madness. And maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be!
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
The pen is the tongue of the soul; as are the thoughts engendered there, so will be the things written.
Variant: The pen is the tongue of the mind.
Miguel de Cervantes(Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
To withdraw is not to run away, and to stay is no wise action when there is more reason to fear than to hope. 'Tis the part of a wise man to keep himself today for tomorrow, and not venture all his eggs in one basket.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Be slow of tongue and quick of eye.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
In order to attain the impossible, one must attempt the absurd. 
Miguel de Cervantes
It is not the hand but the understanding of a man that may be said to write.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
An honest man's word is as good as his bond.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
The best sauce in the world is hunger.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Never stand begging for that which you have the power to earn.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
I must speak the truth, and nothing but the truth.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Let every man mind his own business.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Let none presume to tell me that the pen is preferable to the sword.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
When thou art at Rome, do as they do at Rome.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Tis said of love that it sometimes goes, sometimes flies; runs with one, walks gravely with another; turns a third into ice, and sets a fourth in a flame: it wounds one, another it kills: like lightning it begins and ends in the same moment: it makes.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
No limits but the sky.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
One man scorned and covered with scars still strove with his last ounce of courage to reach the unreachable stars; and the world will be better for this. 
Miguel de Cervantes
The pot calls the kettle black.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
My memory is so bad that many times I forget my own name.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
While I sleep I have no fear, nor hope, nor trouble, nor glory. God bless the inventor of sleep, the cloak that covers all man’s thoughts, the food that cures all hunger, the water that quenches all thirst, the fire that warms the cold, the cold that cools the heart; the common coin, in short, that can purchase all things, the balancing weight that levels the shepherd with the king, and the simple with the wise.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote, 1605 - 1615)
Which I have earned with the sweat of my brows.
Miguel de Cervantes (Don Quixote - Book I, 1605 - 1615)

Miguel de Cervantes Biography

Born: October 9, 1547
Died: April 23, 1616

Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra was a Spanish novelist, poet and playwright. His masterpiece being the world-wide famous novel Don Quixote. Often regarded as one of the best works of fiction ever.

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Notable Works
Novelas Ejemplares (1613)
Don Quixote (1605 - 1615)
Los Trabajos de Persiles y Sigismunda (1617)
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