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Nathaniel Hawthorne Quotes

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Ah, but let her cover the mark as she will, the pang of it will be always in her heart.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter - Chapter II, 1850)
She had not known the weight until she felt the freedom.
Nathaniel Hawthorne
Sunlight is painting. 
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The American Notebooks, 1838)
Life is made up of marble and mud.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The House of Seven Gables, 1851)
A pure hand needs no glove to cover it.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter - Chapter XII, 1850)
What we need for our happiness is often close at hand, if we knew but how to seek for it.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The American Notebooks, 1837)
What other dungeon is so dark as one's own heart! What jailer so inexorable as one's self!
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The House of Seven Gables, 1851)
How slowly I have made my way in life! How much is still to be done! 
Nathaniel Hawthorne (Letter to Horatio Bridge, 1851)
Death should take me while I am in the mood.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Blithedale Romance, 1852)
She could no longer borrow from the future to help her through the present grief.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter - Chapter V, 1850)
There is something truer and more real, than what we can see with the eyes, and touch with the finger.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (Rappaccini's Daughter, 1844)
Every individual has a place to fill in the world, and is important, in some respect, whether he chooses to be so or not.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The American Notebooks, 1836)
Let men tremble to win the hand of woman, unless they win along with it the utmost passion of her heart.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter - Chapter XV, 1850)
Happiness is a butterfly which when pursued is just out of grasp… But if you will sit down quietly, may alight upon you.
Nathaniel Hawthorne
Who can tell where happiness may come, or where, though an expected guest, it may never show its face?
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Marble Faun, 1860)
The world owes all its onward impulses to men ill at ease. The happy man inevitably confines himself within ancient limits.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The House of Seven Gables, 1851)
Nobody, I think, ought to read poetry, or look at pictures or statues, who cannot find a great deal more in them than the poet or artist has actually expressed.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Marble Faun, 1860)
We sometimes congratulate ourselves at the moment of waking from a troubled dream: it may be so the moment after death.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The American Notebooks, 1836)
We must not always talk in the market-place of what happens to us in the forest.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter - Chapter XXII, 1850)
I cannot endure to waste anything so precious as autumnal sunshine by staying in the house.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The American Notebooks, 1842)
Love, whether newly born or aroused from a deathlike slumber, must always create sunshine, filling the heart so full of radiance, that it overflows upon the outward world.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter, 1850)
A bodily disease, which we look upon as whole and entire within itself, may, after all, be but a symptom of some ailment in the spiritual part.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter - Chapter X, 1850)
Nervous and excitable persons need to talk a great deal, by way of letting off their steam.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The English Notebooks, 1853)
Trusting no man as his friend, he could not recognize his enemy when the latter actually appeared.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter - Chapter X, 1850)
If we would know what heaven is before we come thither, let us retire into the depths of our own spirits, and we shall find it there among holy thoughts and feelings.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The American Notebooks, 1841)
No summer ever came back, and no two summers ever were alike. Times change, and people change; and if our hearts do not change as readily, so much the worse for us.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Blithedale Romance, 1852)
Happiness in this world, when it comes, comes incidentally. Make it the object of pursuit, and it leads us a wild-goose chase, and is never attained.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The American Notebooks, 1851)
Shall we never never get rid of this Past? ... It lies upon the Present like a giant's dead body.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The House of Seven Gables, 1851)
Caresses, expressions of one sort or another, are necessary to the life of affections, as leaves are to the life of a tree. If they are wholly restrained, love will die at the roots.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The American Notebooks, 1853)
No man for any considerable period can wear one face to himself and another to the multitude, without finally getting bewildered as to which may be the true.
Nathaniel Hawthorne (The Scarlet Letter - Chapter XX, 1850)
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Biography

Born: July 4, 1804
Died: May 19, 1864

Nathaniel Hawthorne was an American novelist and writer. He is best known for being the author of the highly successful romantic novel "The Scarlet Letter"

Notable Works

Fanshawe (1828)
Twice Told Tales (1837)
The Scarlet Letter (1850)
The House of Seven Gables (1851)
The Blithedale Romance (1852)
Tanglewood Tales (1853)
The Marble Faun (1860)
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