Home iPerceptive Quotes

Niccolo Machiavelli Quotes

1 | 2
Where the willingness is great, the difficulties cannot be great.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 26, 1513)
It is not titles that honor men, but men that honor titles.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - Third Book: Chapter 38, 1513)
It may at times be the highest wisdom to simulate folly.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - Third Book: Chapter 2, 1513)
How easily men may be corrupted.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - First Book: Chapter 42, 1513)
He who wishes to be obeyed must know how to command.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - Third Book: Chapter 22, 1513)
The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.
Niccolo Machiavelli
Occasionally words must serve to veil the facts.
Niccolo Machiavelli
The faults of the people spring from the faults of their rulers.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - First Book: Chapter 29, 1513)
Everyone sees what you appear to be, few experience what you really are.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 18, 1513)
Men are driven by two principal impulses, either by love or by fear.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - Third Book: Chapter 21, 1513)
One must therefore be a fox to recognize traps, and a lion to frighten wolves.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 17, 1513)
There is no avoiding war; it can only be postponed to the advantage of others.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 3, 1513)
Wisdom consists in being able to distinguish among dangers and make a choice of the least harmful.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince, 1513)
War is just when it is necessary; arms are permissible when there is no hope except in arms.
Niccolo Machiavelli
No enterprise is more likely to succeed than one concealed from the enemy until it is ripe for execution.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Art of War, 1520)
How often the judgments of men in important matters are erroneous.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - Second Book: Chapter 22, 1513)
Whosoever desires constant success must change his conduct with the times.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - Third Book: Chapter 9, 1513)
The people as a body are courageous, but individually they are cowardly and feeble.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - First Book: Chapter 57, 1513)
One who deceives will always find those who allow themselves to be deceived.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 18, 1513)
He who neglects what is done for what ought to be done, sooner effects his ruin than his preservation.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 15, 1513)
The first method for estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 22, 1513)
When neither their property nor their honor is touched, the majority of men live content.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 19, 1513)
Hence it comes about that all armed Prophets have been victorious, and all unarmed Prophets have been destroyed.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 6, 1513)
Never do any enemy a small injury for they are like a snake which is half beaten and it will strike back the first chance it gets.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 3, 1513)
There is no other way to guard yourself against flattery than by making men understand that telling you the truth will not offend you.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince, 1513)
So in all human affairs one notices, if one examines them closely, that it is impossible to remove one inconvenience without another emerging.
Niccolo Machiavelli (Discourses on Livy - First Book: Chapter 6, 1513)
Few men are brave by nature, but good order and experience make many so. Good order and discipline in many army are to be depended upon than courage alone.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Art of War - Book 7, 1520)
Like all other things of nature that are born and grow fast, cannot have their roots and connections, so that the first adverse circumstances extinguish them...
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 4, 1513)
There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 6, 1513)
Every one sees what you appear to be, few really know what you are, and those few dare not oppose themselves to the opinion of the many, who have the majesty of the state to defend them.
Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince - Chapter 18, 1513)
1 | 2
Niccolo Machiavelli Biography
Machiavelli portrait and quotes

Born: May 3, 1469
Died: June 21, 1527

Niccolo Machiavelli was an Italian historian, humanist, diplomat, playwright and philosopher. He is most commonly known for his influential books such as "The Prince"

Notable Works

The Prince (1513)
Discourses on Livy
(ca. 1517)
The Art of War
(1520)
Life of Castruccio Castracani
(1520)
Florentine Histories
(1521 - 1525)
Signature
The signature of the Italian diplomat Machiavelli


More Topics »

More Authors »

Quotes by Authors



Related Authors
Francis Bacon
Galileo Galilei
Giordano Bruno
Rousseau
Thomas Hobbes
Voltaire
More Philosopher Quotes »

Misattributed Quotes
It is double pleasure to deceive the deceiver.
Jean de La Fountaine in Fables - Book II