Titus Livius Quotes

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Temerity is not always successful.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXVIII, ca. 26 BCE)
There is nothing worse than being ashamed of parsimony or poverty. 
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXXIV, ca. 26 BCE)
The troubles which have come upon us always seem more serious than those which are only threatening.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book III, ca. 26 BCE)
The result showed that fortune helps the brave.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book VIII, ca. 26 BCE)
Favor and honor sometimes fall more fitly on those who do not desire them.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book IV, ca. 26 BCE) 
The name of freedom regained is sweet to hear.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXIV, ca. 26 BCE)
This above all makes history useful and desirable; it unfolds before our eyes a glorious record of exemplary actions.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Preface, ca. 26 BCE)
The populace is like the sea motionless in itself, but stirred by every wind, even the lightest breeze.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXVIII, ca. 26 BCE)
There is danger in delay.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXXVIII, ca. 26 BCE)
He would not anticipate those counsels which are rather bestowed by circumstances on men, than by men on circumstances.
Variant: He would not anticipate events by disclosing his measures, for, after all, circumstances determined measures for men much more than men made circumstances subservient to measures.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXII, ca. 26 BCE)
Passions are generally roused from great conflict.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book III, ca. 26 BCE)
Before anything else [Numa] decided that he must instill in his subjects the fear of the gods, this being the most effective measure with an ignorant, and at that time uncultured, people.
Variant: Before anything else, he strove to inculcate in their minds the fear of the gods, regarding this as the most powerful influence which could act upon an uncivilised and, in those ages, a barbarous people.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book I, ca. 26 BCE)
There is always more spirit in attack than in defence.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXVIII, ca. 26 BCE)
In difficult and desperate cases, the boldest counsels are the safest.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXV, ca. 26 BCE)
A fraudulent intent, however carefully concealed at the outset, will generally, in the end, betray itself.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XLIV, ca. 26 BCE)
The state is suffering from two opposite vices, avarice and luxury; two plagues which, in the past, have been the ruin of every great empire.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXXIV, ca. 26 BCE)
Greater is our terror of the unknown.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXVIII, ca. 26 BCE)
We can endure neither our vices nor the remedies for them.
Variant: We can bear neither our diseases nor their remedies.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Preface, ca. 26 BCE)
Truth, they say, is but too often in difficulties, but is never finally suppressed.
Variant: It is said that truth is far too often eclipsed but never totally extinguished.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXII, ca. 26 BCE)
Toil and pleasure, dissimilar in nature, are nevertheless united by a certain natural bond.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book IV, ca. 26 BCE)
Better late than never.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book IV, ca. 26 BCE)
Men are only clever at shifting blame from their own shoulders to those of others.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXVIII, ca. 26 BCE)
The most honorable, as well as the safest course, is to rely entirely upon
valour.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXXIV, ca. 26 BCE)
Fortune blinds men when she does not wish them to withstand the violence of her onslaughts.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book V, ca. 26 BCE)
I approach these questions unwillingly, as it wounds, but no cure can be effected without touching upon and handling them.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXVIII, ca. 26 BCE)
No law is sufficiently convenient to all.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXXIV, ca. 26 BCE)
Envy like fire always makes for the highest points.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book VIII, ca. 26 BCE)
There is nothing that is more often clothed in an attractive garb than a false creed.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXXIX, ca. 26 BCE)
The sun has not yet set for all time.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXXIX, ca. 26 BCE)
It is easier to criticize than to correct our past errors.
Variant: It is easier to regret the past than to repair it.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXX, ca. 26 BCE)
Many difficulties which nature throws in our way, may be smoothed away by the exercise of intelligence. 
Titus Livius
He will have true glory who despises it.
Variant: The man who scorns false glory will possess the true.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXII, ca. 26 BCE)
Woe to the conquered!
Variant: Woe to the vanquished!
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book V, ca. 26 BCE)
He is truly a man who will not permit himself to be unduly elated when fortune’s breeze is favorable, or cast down when it is adverse.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XLV, ca. 26 BCE)
There is an old saying which, from its truth, has become proverbial, that friendships should be immortal, enmities mortal.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XL, ca. 26 BCE)
Seldom are good fortune and good sense granted to men at the same time.
Variant: Good fortune and a good disposition are rarely given to the same man.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXX, ca. 26 BCE)
It is easy at any moment to surrender a large fortune; to build one up is a difficult and an arduous task.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXIV, ca. 26 BCE)
Men are slower to recognize blessings than misfortunes.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXX), ca. 26 BCE
There is nothing man will not attempt when great enterprises hold out the promise of great rewards.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book IV, ca. 26 BCE)
Under the influence of fear, which always leads men to take a pessimistic view of things, they magnified their enemies' resources, and minimized their own.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXVII, ca. 26 BCE)
There are laws for peace as well as war.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book IV, ca. 26 BCE)
Shared danger is the strongest of bonds; it will keep men united in spite of mutual dislike and suspicion.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book II, ca. 26 BCE)
Do not expose so many years' good fortune to the hazard of a single hour.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXX, ca. 26 BCE)
Those ills are easiest to bear with which we are most familiar.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXIII, ca. 26 BCE)
No crime can ever be defended on rational grounds.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXVIII, ca. 26 BCE)
Many things complicated by nature are restored by reason.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXV, ca. 26 BCE)
Law is a thing which is insensible, and inexorable, more beneficial and more profitious to the weak than to the strong; it admits of no mitigation nor pardon, once you have overstepped its limits.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book II, ca. 26 BCE)
It is when fortune is the most propitious that she is least to be trusted.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXX, ca. 26 BCE)
Rome has grown since its humble beginnings that it is now overwhelmed by its own greatness.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Preface, ca. 26 BCE)
The greater a man's good fortune the less ought he to count upon it.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXX, ca. 26 BCE)
From abundance springs satiety.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book III, ca. 26 BCE)
All things will be clear and distinct to the man who does not hurry; haste is blind and improvident.
Variant: The man who is not in a hurry will always see his way clearly; haste blunders on blindly.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book XXII, ca. 26 BCE)
The old Romans all wished to have a king over them because they had not yet tasted the sweetness of freedom.
Variant: The ancient Romans could ill brook a foreign king; but amidst this diversity of political views, all were for a monarchy; they had not yet tasted the sweets of liberty.
Titus Livius (Ab Urbe Condita - Book I, ca. 26 BCE)


Titus Livius Biography

Born: 59 BCE
Died: 17 ACE

Titus Livius, also known as Livy was a Roman historian. He is most famous for his book "Ab Urbe Condita". Which encompasses the entire Roman history.

Notable Works

Ab Urbe Condita (ca. 26 BCE)