Home

Topics

Authors

Blog

Whos who in the mystics zoo by iPerceptive

Book by iPerceptive

1890 in History


Births in 1890 Deaths in 1890
Agatha Christie September 15
Dwight D. Eisenhower October 14
Groucho Marx October 2
   
Vincent van Gogh July 29
   
   
   




Quotes in 1890
Anatole France
All religions breed crime.
Anatole France (Thais, 1890)
See all quotes by Anatole France
Emile Zola
Don't go looking at me like that because you'll wear your eyes out.
Emile Zola (Les Rougon-Macquart - La Bête humaine, 1890)
See all quotes by Emile Zola
George Bernard Shaw
A mind of the calibre of mine cannot derive its nutriment from cows.
George Bernard Shaw (Quoted in The Star, 1890)
See all quotes by George Bernard Shaw
Knut Hamsun
I suffered no pain, my hunger had taken the edge off; instead I felt pleasantly empty, untouched by everything around me and happy to be unseen by all. I put my legs up on the bench and leaned back, the best way to feel the true well-being of seclusion. There wasn't a cloud in my mind, nor did I feel any discomfort, and I hadn't a single unfulfilled desire or craving as far as my thought could reach. I lay with open eyes in a state of utter absence from myself and felt deliciously out of it.
Knut Hamsun (Hunger, 1890)
See all quotes by Knut Hamsun
Robert Green Ingersoll
The doctrine of eternal punishment is in perfect harmony with the savagery of the men who made the orthodox creeds. It is in harmony with torture, with flaying alive, and with burnings. The men who burned their fellow-men for a moment, believed that God would burn his enemies forever.
Robert Green Ingersoll (Crumbling Creeds, 1890)
The agnostic does not simply say, "l do not know." He goes another step, and he says, with great emphasis, that you do not know. He insists that you are trading on the ignorance of others, and on the fear of others. He is not satisfied with saying that you do not know, - he demonstrates that you do not know, and he drives you from the field of fact - he drives you from the realm of reason - he drives you from the light, into the darkness of conjecture - into the world of dreams and shadows, and he compels you to say, at last, that your faith has no foundation in fact.
Robert Green Ingersoll (North American Review - Reply to Lyman Abbott, 1890)
In the presence of death I affirm and reaffirm the truth of all that I have said against the superstitions of the world. I would say that much on the subject with my last breath.
Robert Green Ingersoll (Interview, 1890)
See all quotes by Robert Green Ingersoll
Thomas Edison
During all those years of experimentation and research, I never once made a discovery. All my work was deductive, and the results I achieved were those of invention, pure and simple.
Thomas Edison (Harper's Magazine, 1890)
See all quotes by Thomas Edison
Vincent van Gogh
A good picture should be equivalent to a good deed.
Vincent van Gogh (Letter to Albert Aurier, 1890)
I believe so. … Don't accuse anybody else.
Vincent van Gogh (When asked if he had attempted suicide, 1890)
See all quotes by Vincent van Gogh
William James
There is no more miserable human being than one in whom nothing is habitual but indecision.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 4, 1890)
The hell to be endured hereafter, of which theology tells, is no worse than the hell we make for ourselves in this world by habitually fashioning our characters in the wrong way.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 4, 1890)
We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone. Every smallest stroke of virtue or of vice leaves its never so little scar. ...Nothing we ever do is, in strict scientific literalness, wiped out.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 4, 1890)
Keep the faculty of effort alive in you by a little gratuitous exercise every day. That is, be systematically ascetic or heroic in little unnecessary points, do every day or two something for no other reason than that you would rather not do it, so that when the hour of dire need draws nigh, it may find you not unnerved and untrained to stand the test. So with the man who has daily inured himself to habits of concentrated attention, energetic volition, and self-denial in unnecessary things. He will stand like a tower when everything rocks around him, and when his softer fellow-mortals are winnowed like chaff in the blast.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 4, 1890)
Metaphysics means nothing but an unusually obstinate effort to think clearly.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 6, 1890)
The total possible consciousness may be split into parts which co-exist but mutually ignore each other.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 8, 1890)
A thing is important if anyone think it important.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 8, 1890)
The mind, in short, works on the data it receives very much as a sculptor works on his block of stone. In a sense the statue stood there from eternity. But there were a thousand different ones beside it, and the sculptor alone is to thank for having extricated this one from the rest.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 9, 1890)
Our self-feeling in this world depends entirely on what we back ourselves to be and do.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 10, 1890)
A young woman of twenty reacts with intuitive promptitude and security in all the usual circumstances in which she may be placed. Her likes and dislikes are formed; her opinions, to a great extent, the same that they will be through life. Her character is, in fact, finished in its essentials. How inferior to her is a boy of twenty in all these respects! His character is still gelatinous, uncertain what shape to assume, "trying it on" in every direction. Feeling his power, yet ignorant of the manner in which he shall express it, he is, when compared to his sister, a being of no definite contour.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 10, 1890)
Properly speaking, a man has as many social selves as there are individuals who recognise him.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 10, 1890)
In youth we may have an absolutely new experience, subjective or objective, every hour of the day. Apprehension is vivid, retentiveness strong, and our recollections of that time, like those in a time spent in rapid and interesting travel, are of something intricate, multitudinous, and long-drawn-out. But as each passing year converts some of this experience into automatic routine which we hardly note at all, the days and the weeks smooth themselves out in recollection to a contentless unit, and the years grow hollow and collapse.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 11, 1890)
Creatures extremely low in the intellectual scale may have conception. All that is required is that they should recognize the same experience again.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 12, 1890)
Let any one try, I will not say to arrest, but to notice or attend to, the present moment of time. One of the most baffling experiences occurs. Where is it, this present? It has melted in our grasp, fled ere we could touch it, gone in the instant of becoming.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 15, 1890)
The stream of thought flows on; but most of its segments fall into the bottomless abyss of oblivion. Of some, no memory survives the instant of their passage. Of others, it is confined to a few moments, hours or days. Others, again, leave vestiges which are indestructible, and by means of which they may be recalled as long as life endures.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 16, 1890)
Genius, in truth, means little more than the faculty of perceiving in an unhabitual way.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 19, 1890)
Man needs a rule for his will, and will invent one if one be not given him.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 21, 1890)
The impulse to take life strivingly is indestructible in the race.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 21, 1890)
Fatalism, whose solving word in all crises of behavior is "All striving is vain," will never reign supreme, for the impulse to take life strivingly is indestructible in the race. Moral creeds which speak to that impulse will be widely successful in spite of inconsistency, vagueness, and shadowy determination of expectancy. Man needs a rule for his will, and will invent one if one be not given him.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 21, 1890)
My thinking is first and last and always for the sake of my doing.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 22, 1890)
The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.
William James (Principles of Psychology - Chapter 22, 1890)
The transition from tenseness, self-responsibility, and worry, to equanimity, receptivity, and peace, is the most wonderful of all those shiftings of inner equilibrium, those changes of personal centre of energy, which I have analyzed so often; and the chief wonder of it is that it so often comes about, not by doing, but by simply relaxing and throwing the burden down.
William James (Principles of Psychology, 1890)
The great thing, then, in all education, is to make our nervous system our ally instead of our enemy.
William James (Principles of Psychology, 1890)
Consciousness... does not appear to itself chopped up in bits. Such words as "chain" or 'train' do not describe it fitly as it presents itself in the first instance. It is nothing jointed; it flows. A"river" or a "stream" are the metaphors by which it is most naturally described. In talking of it hereafter, let us call it the stream of thought, of consciousness, or of subjective life.
Source of the expression "stream of consciousness".
William James (Principles of Psychology, 1890)
Nature in her unfathomable designs had mixed us of clay and flame, of brain and mind, that the two things hang indubitably together and determine each other's being but how or why, no mortal may ever know.
William James (Principles of Psychology, 1890)
The function of ignoring, of inattention, is as vital a factor in mental progress as the function of attention itself. 
William James (Principles of Psychology, 1890)
See all quotes by William James
Popular Topics Popular Authors
Anger Quotes
Courage Quotes
Death Quotes

Happiness Quotes
Honesty Quotes

Imagination Quotes
Life Quotes
Motivational Quotes
Success Quotes
Wisdom Quotes
More Topics »
Abraham Lincoln
Albert Camus
Albert Einstein
Bertrand Russell
Confucius
Elbert Hubbard
John Lennon
Marcus Aurelius
Mark Twain
Sigmund Freud
More Authors »


Subscribe to iPerceptives weekly inspirations!

Featured Historical Figure
"Never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never - in nothing, great or small, large or petty - never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense."