Francis Bacon Quotes

Francis Bacon Quote: The sun, which passeth through pollutions and itself remains as pure as before.
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Nothing doth more hurt in a state than that cunning men pass for wise.
Francis Bacon (Of Cunning, 1625)
The sun, which passeth through pollutions and itself remains as pure as before.
Francis Bacon (The Advancement of Learning - Book II, 1605)
Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man.
Francis Bacon (Of Studies, 1625)
A little philosophy inclineth man’s mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men’s minds about to religion.
Francis Bacon (Of Atheism, 1612)
Hope is a good breakfast, but it is a bad supper.
Francis Bacon (Apophthegms, 1624)
A healthy body is the guest-chamber of the soul; a sick, its prison.
Francis Bacon
There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion.
Francis Bacon (Of Beauty, 1625)
There is nothing more certain in nature than that it is impossible for any body to be utterly annihilated.
Francis Bacon (Sylva Sylvarum Century X, 1627)
Chiefly the mould of a man’s fortune is in his own hands.
Francis Bacon (Of Fortune, 1625)
They are ill discoverers that think there is no land, when they can see nothing but sea.
Francis Bacon (The Advancement of Learning - Book II, 1605)
Natural abilities are like natural plants; they need pruning by study.
Francis Bacon (Of Studies, 1625)
Francis Bacon Quote: If a man look sharply and attentively, he shall see Fortune; for though she is blind,
If a man look sharply and attentively, he shall see Fortune; for though she is blind, she is not invisible.
Francis Bacon (Of Fortune, 1625)
Truth is the daughter of time, not of authority.
Francis Bacon (Of Truth, 1625)
Time, which is the author of authors.
Francis Bacon (The Advancement of Learning - Book I, 1605)
Silence is the virtue of fools.
Francis Bacon (De Augmentis Scientiarum, 1623)
Books must follow sciences, and not sciences books.
Francis Bacon (Resuscitatio, 1657)
Time is the greatest innovator.
Francis Bacon (Of Innovation, 1625)
We cannot conceive of any end or limit to the world, but always as of necessity it occurs to us that there is something beyond...
Francis Bacon (The New Organon - Book I, 1620)
All colours will agree in the dark.
Francis Bacon (Quoted in Francis Bacon: The Major Works, 2002)
It is not the lie that passeth through the mind, but the lie that sinketh in and settleth in it, that doth the hurt.
Francis Bacon (Of Truth, 1625)
The human understanding is of its own nature prone to suppose the existence of more order and regularity in the world than it finds.
Francis Bacon (The New Organon - Book I, 1620)
Those who have taken upon them to lay down the law of nature as a thing already searched out and understood, whether they have spoken in simple assurance or professional affectation, have therein done philosophy and the sciences great injury.
Francis Bacon (The New Organon, 1620)
Read not to contradict and confute, nor to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider.
Variant: Read not to contradict and confute, not to believe and take for granted, not to find talk and discourse, but to weigh and consider.
Francis Bacon (Of Studies, 1625)
It hath been an opinion that the French are wiser than they seem, and the Spaniards seem wiser than they are; but howsoever it be between nations, certainly it is so between man and man.
Francis Bacon (Of Seeming Wise, 1612)
Physic is of little use to a temperate person, for a man's own observation on what he finds does him good or what hurts him, is the best physic to preserve health. 
Francis Bacon (Of Regiment of Health, 1625)
If a man be gracious and courteous to strangers, it shows he is a citizen of the world, and that his heart is no island cut off from other lands, but a continent that joins to them.
Francis Bacon (Of Goodness and Goodness of Nature, 1612)
Travel, in the younger sort, is a part of education; in the elder, a part of experience. He that travelleth into a country before he hath some entrance into the language, goeth to school, and not to travel.
Francis Bacon (Of Travel, 1625)
Man, being the servant and interpreter of Nature, can do and understand so much and so much only as he has observed in fact or in thought of the course of nature. Beyond this he neither knows anything nor can do anything.
Francis Bacon (The New Organon - Book I, 1620)
It is idle to expect any great advancement in science from the superinducing and engrafting of new things upon old. We must begin anew from the very foundations, unless we would revolve for ever in a circle with mean and contemptible progress.
Francis Bacon (The New Organon, 1620)
Far more, however, has knowledge suffered from littleness of spirit and the smallness and slightness of the tasks which human industry has proposed to itself. And what is worst of all, this very littleness of spirit comes with a certain air of arrogance and superiority.
Francis Bacon (The New Organon - Book I, 1620)
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Francis Bacon Biography

Born: January 22, 1561
Died: April 9, 1626

Sir Francis Bacon was an English philosopher, statesman, writer, scientist, and lawyer. He has had an big influence on philosophy and science. He has also been called as the father of empiricism.

Notable Works

Essays (1597)
The Proficience and Advancement of Learning (1605)
The Wisdom of the Ancients (1619)
Novum Organum (1620)
New Atlantis (1626)
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