Robert Frost Quotes

1 | 2 | 3
She had no saying dark enough
For the dark pine that kept
Forever trying the window latch
Of the room where they slept.
      The tireless but ineffectual hands
That with every futile pass
Made the great tree seem as a little bird
Before the mystery of glass!
      It never had been inside the room,
And only one of the two
Was afraid in an oft-repeated dream
Of what the tree might do.
Robert Frost (The Oft-Repeated Dream, 1921)
Dust always blowing about the town,
Except when sea-fog laid it down,
And I was one of the children told
Some of the blowing dust was gold.
      All the dust the wind blew high
Appeared like god in the sunset sky,
But I was one of the children told
Some of the dust was really gold.
      Such was life in the Golden Gate:
Gold dusted all we drank and ate,
And I was one of the children told,
'We all must eat our peck of gold.'
Robert Frost (A Peck of Gold, 1926)
No speed of wind or water rushing by
But you have a speed far greater. You can climb
Back up a stream of radiance to the sky,
And back through history up the stream of time.
And you were given this swiftness, not for haste
Nor chiefly that you may go where you will.
But in the rush of everything to waste,
That you may have the power of standing still
Off any still or moving thing you say.
Two such as you with a master speed
Cannot be parted nor be swept away
From one another once you are agreed
That life is only life forevermore
Together wing to wing and oar to oar.
Robert Frost (The Master Speed)
When the spent sun throws up its rays on cloud
And goes down burning into the gulf below,
No voice in nature is heard to cry aloud
At what has happened. Birds, at least must know
It is the change to darkness in the sky.
Murmuring something quiet in her breast,
One bird begins to close a faded eye;
Or overtaken too far from his nest,
Hurrying low above the grove, some waif
Swoops just in time to his remembered tree.
At most he thinks or twitters softly, "Safe!
Now let the night be dark for all of me.
Let the night bee too dark for me to see
Into the future. Let what will be, be."
Robert Frost (Acceptance)
And life is too much like a pathless wood
Where your face burns and tickles with the cobwebs
Broken across it, and one eye is weeping
From a twig's having lashed across it open.
I'd like to get away from earth awhile
And then come back to it and begin over.
May no fate willfully misunderstand me
And half grant what I wish and snatch me away
Not to return. Earth's the right place for love:
I don't know where it's likely to go better.
I'd like to go by climbing a birch tree,
And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk
Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more,
But dipped its top and set me down again.
That would be good both going and coming back.
One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.
Robert Frost (Birches)
It went many years,
But at last came a knock,
And I thought of the door
With no lock to lock.
      I blew out the light,
I tip-toed the floor,
And raised both hands
In prayer to the door.
      But the knock came again
My window was wide;
I climbed on the sill
And descended outside.
      Back over the sill
I bade a "Come in"
To whoever the knock
At the door may have been.
      So at a knock
I emptied my cage
To hide in the world
And alter with age.
Robert Frost (The Lockless Door)
My Sorrow, when she's here with me,
Thinks these dark days of autumn rain
Are beautiful as days can be;
She loves the bare, the withered tree;
She walks the sodden pasture lane.
      Her pleasure will not let me stay.
She talks and I am fain to list:
She's glad the birds are gone away,
She's glad her simple worsted gray
Is silver now with clinging mist.
      The desolate, deserted trees,
The faded earth, the heavy sky,
The beauties she so truly sees,
She thinks I have no eye for these,
And vexes me for reason why.
      Not yesterday I learned to know
The love of bare November days
Before the coming of the snow,
But it were vain to tell her so,
And they are better for her praise.
Robert Frost (My November Guest, 1915)
Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
     Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,
      And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
      I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
Robert Frost (The Road Not Taken, 1916)
1 | 2 | 3

Robert Frost Biography

Born: March 26, 1874
Died: January 29, 1963

Robert Frost was an American poet. Frost and his poetry was and still is held in great esteem. He is best known for his realistic depictions of the life in the countryside.

Notable Works/Poems
Mending Wall (1914)
The Death of the Hired Man (1915)
The Road Not Taken (1916)
Out, Out (1916)
Fire and Ice (1920)
Nothing Gold Can Stay (1923)
Acquainted with the Night (1928)
Signature

Picture Quotes




Nirvanic Insights Spiritual Teachings: Book by Seeker on Amazon