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Marcel Proust Quotes

Love is a reciprocal torture. 
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time, 1913 - 1927)
We become moral when we are unhappy.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919)
Always try to keep a patch of sky above your life.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
Let us leave pretty women to men devoid of imagination.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VI: The Sweet Cheat Gone, 1925)
We must never be afraid to go too far, for truth lies beyond.
Marcel Proust
Love is a striking example of how little reality means to us.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time, 1913 - 1927)
A change in the weather is sufficient to recreate the world and ourselves.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. III: The Guermantes Way, 1920 - 1921)
We are healed of a suffering only by experiencing it to the full.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VI: The Sweet Cheat Gone, 1925)
The regularity of a habit is generally in proportion to its absurdity.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. V: The Captive, 1923)
It comes so soon, the moment when there is nothing left to wait for.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919) 
Desire makes everything blossom; possession makes everything wither and fade.
Marcel Proust (Les Plaisirs et les Jours, 1896)
Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible. 
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VII: The Past Recaptured, 1927)
We must all, in order to make reality more tolerable, keep alive in us a few little follies.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919)
Let us be grateful to people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.
Marcel Proust (Pleasures and Regrets, 1896)

Marcel Proust Quote: The real voyage of discovery consists ...
The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. V: The Captive, 1923)
There are perhaps no days of our childhood we lived so fully as those we spent with a favorite book.
Marcel Proust (Quoted in On Reading, 1972)
It is not because other people are dead that our affection for them grows faint, it is because we ourselves are dying.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time, 1913 - 1927)
Through art alone are we able to emerge from ourselves, to know what another person sees.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VII: The Past Recaptured, 1927)
Illness is the doctor to whom we pay most heed; to kindness, to knowledge, we make promise only; pain we obey.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. IV: Cities of the Plain, 1921 - 1922)
It is always thus, impelled by a state of mind which is destined not to last, that we make our irrevocable decisions./dt>
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
Three-quarters of the sicknesses of intelligent people come from their intelligence. They need at least a doctor who can understand this sickness.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919)
We construct our life for one person and, when finally we are ready to receive that person in our life, she does not come, then dies in our eyes and we live as prisoners of that which was meant only for her.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919)
It is up to my spirit to find the truth. But how? Grave uncertainty, each time the spirit feels beyond its own comprehension; when it, the explorer, is altogether to obscure land that it must search and where all its baggage is of no use. To search? That is not all: to create.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
I was left alone there in the company of the orchids, roses and violets, which, like people waiting beside you who do not know you, preserved a silence which their individuality as living things made all the more striking, and warmed themselves in the heat of a glowing coal fire...
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919)
Everything great in the world comes from neurotics. They alone have founded our religions and composed our masterpieces.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. III: The Guermantes Way, 1920 - 1921)
We do not succeed in changing things according to our desire, but gradually our desire changes.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VI: The Sweet Cheat Gone, 1925)
The only true voyage of discovery, the only fountain of Eternal Youth, would be not to visit strange lands but to possess other eyes, to behold the universe through the eyes of another, of a hundred others, to behold the hundred universes that each of them beholds, that each of them is.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. V: The Captive, 1923)
A powerful idea communicates some of its strength to him who challenges it.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919) 
The thirst for something other than what we have…to bring something new, even if it is worse, some emotion, some sorrow; when our sensibility, which happiness has silenced like an idle harp, wants to resonate under some hand, even a rough one, and even if it might be broken by it.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
But sometimes illumination comes to our rescue at the very moment when all seems lost; we have knocked at every door and they open on nothing until, at last, we stumble unconsciously against the only one through which we can enter the kingdom we have sought in vain a hundred years - and it opens.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VII: The Past Recaptured, 1927)
We say that the hour of death cannot be forecast, but when we say this we imagine that hour as placed in an obscure and distant future. It never occurs to us that it has any connection with the day already begun or that death could arrive this same afternoon, this afternoon which is so certain and which has every hour filled in advance. 
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. III: The Guermantes Way, 1920 - 1921)
There is probably not one person, however great his virtue, who cannot be led by the complexities of life's circumstances to a familiarity with the vices he condemns the most vehemently - without his completely recognizing this vice which, disguised as certain events, touches him and wounds him: strange words, an inexplicable attitude, on a given night, of the person whom he otherwise has so many reasons to love.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
The places we have known do not only belong to the world of space in which we situate them for the sake of simplicity. They were but a thin slice between contiguous impression which formed our lives back then; the memory of a certain image is but the regret of a certain instant; and the houses, the roads, the avenues are fleeting, alas! as the years.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
In love, barriers cannot be destroyed from the outside by the one to whom the cause despair, no matter what he does; and it is only when he is no longer concerned with them that, suddenly, as a result of work coming from elsewhere, accomplished within the one who did not love him, these barriers, formerly attacked without success, fall futilely.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919) 
There is no man, however wise, who has not at some period of his youth said things, or lived in a way the consciousness of which is so unpleasant to him in later life that he would gladly, if he could, expunge it from his memory. 
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919) 
Knowing does not always allow us to prevent, but at least the things that we know, we hold them, if not in our hands, but at least in our thoughts where we may dispose of them at our whim, which gives us the illusion of power over them.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
In a separation it is the one who is not really in love who says the more tender things.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. V: The Captive, 1923)
Happiness is beneficial for the body but it is grief that develops the powers of the mind.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VII: The Past Recaptured, 1927)
If a little dreaming is dangerous, the cure for it is not to dream less but to dream more, to dream all the time.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919) 
The moments of the past do not remain still; they retain in our memory the motion which drew them towards the future, towards a future which has itself become the past, and draw us on in their train.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VI: The Sweet Cheat Gone, 1925)
Time passes, and little by little everything that we have spoken in falsehood becomes true.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VI: The Sweet Cheat Gone, 1925)
Perhaps it is nothingness which is real and our dream which is non-existent, but then we feel think that these musical phrases, and the notions related to the dream, are nothing too. We will die, but our hostages are the divine captives who will follow our chance. And death with them is somewhat less bitter, less inglorious, perhaps less probable.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
I believe that reading, in its original essence, in that fruitful miracle of a communication in the midst of solitude.
Marcel Proust (Quoted in On Reading, 1972)
Like many intellectuals, he was incapable of saying a simple thing in a simple way. 
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919) 
The features of our face are hardly more than gestures which force of habit made permanent. Nature, like the destruction of Pompeii, like the metamorphosis of a nymph into a tree, has arrested us in an accustomed movement.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919) 
People do not die for us immediately, but remain bathed in a sort of aura of 
life which bears no relation to true immortality but through which they 
continue to occupy our thoughts in the same way as when they were alive. It 
is as though they were traveling abroad.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time, 1913 - 1927)
The time which we have at our disposal every day is elastic; the passions that we feel expand it, those that we inspire contract it; and habit fills up what remains.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919)
In his younger days a man dreams of possessing the heart of the woman whom he loves; later, the feeling that he possesses the heart of a woman may be enough to make him fall in love with her.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
When we are in love, the sentiment is too great to be contained whole within us; it radiates out to our beloved, finds in her a surface which stops it, forces it to return to its point of departure, and it is this rebound of our own tenderness which we call the other's affection and which charms us more than when it first went out because we do not see that it comes from us. 
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919)
We have nothing to fear and a great deal to learn from trees, that vigorous and pacific tribe which without stint produces strengthening essences for us, soothing balms, and in whose gracious company we spend so many cool, silent and intimate hours.
Marcel Proust (Pleasures and Regrets, 1896)
The bonds that unite another person to ourself exist only in our mind. Memory as it grows fainter relaxes them, and notwithstanding the illusion by which we would fain be cheated and with which, out of love, friendship, politeness, deference, duty, we cheat other people, we exist alone. Man is the creature that cannot emerge from himself, that knows his fellows only in himself; when he asserts the contrary, he is lying.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VI: The Sweet Cheat Gone, 1925)
I knew very well that this hope was chimerical. I was like a pauper who mingles fewer tears with his dry bread if he tells himself that at any moment a stranger will bequeath to him his fortune. We must all, in order to make reality more tolerable, keep alive in us a few little follies.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919)
But, when nothing subsists from a distant past, after the death of others, after the destruction of objects, only the senses of smell and taste, weaker but more enduring, more intangible, more persistent, more faithful, continue for a long time, like souls, to remember, to wait, to hope, on the ruins of all the rest, to bring without flinching, on their nearly impalpable droplet, the immense edifice of memory.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. I: Swann's Way, 1913)
By art alone we are able to get outside ourselves, to know what another sees of this universe which for him is not ours, the landscapes of which would remain as unknown to us as those of the moon. Thanks to art, instead of seeing one world, our own, we see it multiplied and as many original artists as there are, so many worlds are at our disposal, differing more widely from each other than those which roll round the infinite and which, whether their name be Rembrandt or Ver Meer, send us their unique rays many centuries after the hearth from which they emanate is extinguished.
     This labour of the artist to discover a means of apprehending beneath matter and experience, beneath words, something different from their appearance, is of an exactly contrary nature to the operation in which pride, passion, intelligence and habit are constantly engaged within us when we spend our lives without self-communion, accumulating as though to hide our true impressions, the terminology for practical ends which we falsely call life.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VII: The Past Recaptured, 1927)
We are not provided with wisdom, we must discover it for ourselves, after a journey through the wilderness which no one else can take for us, an effort which no one can spare us.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. II: Within a Budding Grove, 1919)
We do not succeed in changing things according to our desire, but gradually our desire changes. The situation that we hoped to change because it was intolerable becomes unimportant. We have not managed to surmount the obstacle, as we were absolutely determined to do, but life has taken us round it, led us past it, and then if we turn round to gaze at the remote past, we can barely catch sight of it, so imperceptible has it become.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VI: The Sweet Cheat Gone, 1925)
We passionately long that there may be another life in which we shall be similar to what we are here below. But we do not pause to reflect that, even without waiting for that other life, in this life, after a few years we are unfaithful to what we have been, to what we wished to remain immortally.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. IV: Cities of the Plain, 1921 - 1922)
A woman is of greater service to our life if she is in it, instead of being an element of happiness, an instrument of sorrow, and there is not a woman in the world the possession of whom is as precious as that of the truths which she reveals to us by causing us to suffer.
Marcel Proust (In Search of Lost Time - Vol. VI: The Sweet Cheat Gone, 1925)
It is comforting when one has a sorrow to lie in the warmth of one's bed and there, abandoning all effort and all resistance, to bury even one's head under the cover, giving one's self up to it completely, moaning like branches in the autumn wind. But there is still a better bed, full of divine odors. It is our sweet, our profound, our impenetrable friendship.
Marcel Proust (Pleasures and Regrets, 1896)
The paradoxes of today are the prejudices of tomorrow, since the most benighted and the most deplorable prejudices have had their moment of novelty when fashion lent them its fragile grace.
Marcel Proust (Pleasures and Regrets, 1896)
Marcel Proust Biography

Born: July 10, 1871
Died: November 18, 1922

Marcel Proust was a French novelist and writer. He is best known for his monumental novel "In Search of Lost Time." He is commonly regarded as a great novelist.

Notable Works

Pleasures and Days (1896)
The Bible of Amiens (1904)
In Search of Lost Time, also known as Remembrance of Things Past (1913 - 1927):
 Swann's Way (1913)
 Within a Budding Grove (1919)
 The Guermantes Way (1920 - 1921)
 Cities of the Plain (1921 - 1922)
 The Captive (1923)
 The Sweet Cheat Gone (1925)
 The Past Recaptured (1927)


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