Mary Shelley Quotes

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Live, and be happy, and make others so.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
I shall die, and what I now feel be no longer felt.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel...
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
"Man," I cried, "How ignorant art thou in thy pride of wisdom!"
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Every where I see bliss, from which I alone am irrevocably excluded.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Nothing contributes so much to tranquillize the mind as a steady purpose.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Perfect happiness is an attribute of angels; and those who have it, appear angelic
Mary Shelley (The Last Man, 1826)
I shall die... I shall no longer see the sun or stars or feel the winds play on my cheeks.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Life, although it may only be an accumulation of anguish, is dear to me, and I will defend it.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
The very winds whispered in soothing accents, and maternal Nature bade me weep no more.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of void, but out of chaos.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Every thing must have a beginning ... and that beginning must be linked to something that went before.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Thus strangely are our souls constructed, and by slight ligaments are we bound to prosperity and ruin.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
How mutable are our feelings, and how strange is that clinging love we have of life even in the excess of misery!
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
The companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which I should first break through, and pour a torrent of light into our dark world.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
The agony of my feelings allowed me no respite; no incident occurred from which my rage and misery could not extract its food.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
The moon gazed on my midnight labours, while, with unrelaxed and breathless eagerness, I pursued nature to her hiding-places.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Nothing contributes so much to tranquilize the mind as a steady purpose -- a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
My dreams were all my own; I accounted for them to nobody; they were my refuge when annoyed - my dearest pleasure when free.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
With how many things are we on the brink of becoming acquainted, if cowardice or carelessness did not restrain our inquiries.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
The world to me was a secret, which I desired to discover; to her it was a vacancy, which she sought to people with imaginations of her own.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
Her countenance was all expression; her eyes were not dark but impenetrably deep; you seemed to discover space after space in their intellectual glance.
Mary Shelley (The Last Man, 1826)
A truce to philosophy! - Life is before me and I rush into possession. Hope, glory, love, and blameless ambition are my guides, and my soul knows no dread.
Mary Shelley (The Last Man, 1826)
At the age of twenty six I am in the condition of an aged person - all my old friends are gone.. & my heart fails when I think by how few ties I hold to the world..
Mary Shelley (Journal Entry, 1824)
I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
The whole series of my life appeared to me as a dream; I sometimes doubted if indeed it were all true, for it never presented itself to my mind with the force of reality.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the gratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you, as mine has been.
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein, 1818)
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Mary Shelley Biography

Born: August 30, 1797
Died: February 1, 1851

Mary Shelley was an English novelist and writer. She is best known for her majorly successful gothic novel "Frankenstein". She was also known for publishing her husbands works.

Notable Works

Frankenstein (1818)
The Last Man (1826)

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Mary Wollstonecraft (Mother)
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